Richard Nixon Quotes

The kids, like all kids, loved the dog [Checkers], and I just want to say this, right now, that regardless of what they say about it, we are going to keep it.

23rd September, 1952. Televised speech responding to allegation of a political slush fund.

Pat [Nixon’s wife] doesn’t have a mink coat. But she does have a respectable Republican cloth coat.

23rd September, 1952. Televised speech responding to allegation of a political slush fund.

You won’t have Nixon to kick around anymore, because, gentlemen, this is my last press conference.

5th or 7th November, 1962. To the press on being defeated in race for governor of California.

I hope that . . . television, radio, and the press first recognize the great responsibility they have to report all the news and, second, recognize that they have a right and a responsibility, if they are against a candidate—give him the shaft. But also recognize, if they give him the shaft—put one lonely reporter on the campaign who will report what the candidate says, now and then.

8th November, 1962. Quoted in the L.A. Times.

What America needs most today is what it once had, but has lost: the lift of a driving dream.

3rd February, 1968. Campaign speech in Concord, New Hampshire.

Bring us together again.

31st October, 1968. Speech in New York City, quoting a sign help up by a young girl.

The greatest honor history can bestow is the title of peacemaker.

20th January, 1969. First Inaugural Address.

This is the greatest week inthe history of the world since the Creation.

24th July, 1969. Upon the return to earth of the crew of Apollo 11 from the moon.

After a third of a century of power flowing from the people and the States to Washington it is time for a New Federalism in which power, funds, and responsibility will flow from Washington to the States and to the people.

8th August, 1969. Address to Nation on Domestic Policy.

North Vietnam cannot defeat or humiliate the United States. Only Americans can do that.

3rd November, 1969. Speech.

Let historians not record that when America was the most powerful nation in the world we passed on the other side of the road and allowed the last hopes for peace and freedom of millions of people to be suffocated by the forces of totalitarianism. And so tonight—to you, the great silent majority of my fellow Americans—I ask for your support.

3rd November, 1969. Speech.

The Chinese are a great and vital people who should not remain isolated from the international community. … It is certainly in our interest, and in the interest of people and stability in Asia and the world, that we take what steps we can towards improved practical relations with Peking.

February 1970. First Foreign Policy report to Congress.

If when the chips are down, the world’s most powerful nation … acts like a pitiful, helpless giant, the forces of totalitarianism and anarchy will threaten free nations and free institutions throughout the world.

30th April, 1970. Televised speech announcing a major offensive into Cambodia.

It is time for the great silent majority of Americans to stand up and be counted.

October 1970 election speech.

I want you all to stonewall it, let them plead the Fifth Amendment, cover-up or anything else, if it’ll save it-save the plan.

22nd March, 1973. Presidential transcript.

There can be no whitewash at the White House.

30th April, 1973. Televised speech.

People have got to know whether or not their President is a crook. Well, I’m not a crook.

11th November, 1973. Press conference.

I made my mistakes, but in all my years of public life, I have never profited, never profited from public service. I’ve earned every cent. And in all of my years in public life I have never obstructed justice…I welcome this kind of examination because people have got to know whether or not their President is a crook. Well, I’m not a crook.

17th November, 1973. Speech at a Press Conference.

A loose cannon.

3rd May 1974. On John Dean. Quoted in the Washington Post.

You fellows, in your business, have a way of handling problems like this. Somebody leaves a pistol in the drawer. I don’t have a pistol.

7th August, 1974. Remark to General Alexander Haig. Quoted in Woodward and Bernstein’s The Final Days.

In the past few days . . . it has become evident to me that I no longer have a strong enough political base in the Congress to justify continuing that effort [to remain President]. . . . But with the disappearance of that base, I now believe that the constitutional purpose has been served, and there is no longer a need for the process to be prolonged.

8th August, 1974. Address to Nation announcing his decision to resign.

I have never been a quitter. To leave office before my term is completed is abhorrent to every instinct in my body. But as President I must put the interests of America first. . . . Therefore, I shall resign the presidency, effective at noon tomorrow.

8th August, 1974. Address to Nation announcing his decision to resign.

Always give your best, never get discouraged, never be petty; always remember, others may hate you. Those who hate you don’t win unless you hate them. And then you destroy yourself.

9th August, 1974. Address to members of his Administration upon leaving office.

This country needs good farmers, good businessmen, good plumbers, good carpenters.

9th August, 1974. Address to members of his Administration upon leaving office.

When the President does it, that means that it is not illegal.

19th May, 1977. Interview with David Frost.

I brought myself down. I gave them a sword. And they stuck it in and they twisted it with relish.

19th May, 1977. Interview with David Frost.